Fresh Start

Thank you all who commented on Friday’s post. I have unpublished it now, as intended to do as we come up to another edition of WFNC tomorrow.

I was very touched by your comments and really appreciate the time you took to write them. I have not deleted them and will keep them to re-read when I am struggling.

For me and for other bulb growers in the Northern hemisphere, last week marked the start of the new season as the bulbs were watered again after their dry summer rest.

Some respond very quickly to water, others respond to cooler nights and were popping up flowers even before watering started. Come back tomorrow for When Fashion and Nature Collide. Meanwhile here are some bulbs and succulents in flower from the last few days. Some have been published already on Instagram.

Starting with a fast-responder. Watering was on Monday, secnd picture of shoots was on thursday, Flowers were on Saturday. Five days from watering to flowering. This is Habranthus tubispathus – one of the Rain Lilies.

This one is a stray in a nearby pot!
Biarum zeleborii
Tigridia vanhouttei
The tiny, dainty, Acis rosea
Cyclamen hederifolium
Cyclamen graecum
Conophytum taylorianum rosynense
Conophytum x marnierianum
Colchicum variegatum
Colchicum pyrenaicum
Huernia pillansii

26 Comments

  1. I love the way plants can respond so quickly to changes in their environment. I feel like I should be able to say something profound-ish about humans’ too, but I’m more likely to sound trite.
    The flowers are lovely Darren, and I hope they bring you some joy.

    Liked by 6 people

  2. Thank you Arbie. I am actually careful about showing the Conophytums now because the far East has gone crazy for them. When I got my collection together a decade ago I could get most of them for 2 or 3 pounds. Last month I saw a packet of seeds sell on ebay for £700….

    Liked by 3 people

  3. I’ve never heard of bulbs responding so quickly to being watered! You will laugh at me plant-wise. A couple of weeks ago I ordered some strep leaves and got those planted. Tonight I had this fair bit of panic that winter is coming on fast and I’d best get any plants now that need to be mailed. So I ordered 50 succulent cuttings. It was the sheer terror of being cut off from my online plant sources. Don’t ask me where I’m going to put them! I need more windowsills for terrariums! So to help save me from myself, more pictures of your plants are needed so that I can live vicariously through you!

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Such happiness filling your greenhouse. I love the life and the colors of these gorgeous flowers. I especially love the Huernia pillansii it would make a lovely collage with sea items. The colors are so regal. I enjoyed this so much. Enjoy these my friend. Love and hugs to you!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. I get that totally Linda. Similar thing happening here as Brexit (and leaving the Customs Union) will effectively end plant buying from Europe for amateurs like me – only big nurseries will be able to afford the paperwork. Especially CITES plants like orchids and cacti.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thank you Lisa. There have been so many new things flowering this year, including that Huernia.
    I just left the lab to change a gas cylinder and noticed the landscapers have planted strawberries with deep red flowers. They are in fruit too and the fruit is very tasty 🙂 I think some rooted runners may be going home with me….

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Like always seeing your flowers simply make my day – they’re all so beautiful, Darren! And so fast too!! That’s the marvel of nature – you simply can’t beat it! 😀

    Liked by 4 people

  8. I probably will sound trite but seems to me that our lives are similar to flowers. Different kind of species bloom in different seasons, responding to cues from seasonal changes. Similarly, we each have a timetable wherein we blossom. The rate in which this happens is not always determined by our own efforts —it’s often simply a question of timing, and sometimes it depends on the people that surround us! Huge crush for the ‘tiny, dainty, Acis rosea’, and love the heart shape of the ‘Conophytum taylorianum rosynense’. Beautiful post Darren.

    Like

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